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  1. #31
    Pizza Delivery
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    Paragraph 1- Yeah
    Paragraph 2- Right I said that.
    Paragraph 3- I agree for the most part, I was trying to follow the KISS method and not add in more than should be taught in a purely written forum. Airway obstruction as far as FBAO was probably more than I wanted to cover. Airway obstruction as far as the tongue, I think I hit with modified jaw thrust.

    Thanks for the input. If you think of anything else relevant let me know.

    37
    It takes 40 muscles to frown and 4 to pull the trigger on a decent sniper rifle.

    GOD I WANT MY BIKE BACK

  2. #32
    Street Cruiser MASSIVE's Avatar
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    Great Job FM! You covered it all. Lee RN, CNOR, EMT

    New Mexico the land of Enchantment....I love it.... Lee

  3. #33
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    Got an personal message and thought I would bring this to the top again
    37
    It takes 40 muscles to frown and 4 to pull the trigger on a decent sniper rifle.

    GOD I WANT MY BIKE BACK

  4. #34
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    Mar 2009
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    just thought I would throw in a few pointers .

    A. dont forget about traffic management, if you are riding with a group and theres others there , make sure one at either end is waiving down cars, slowing them or directing traffic.
    Parking a bike across the road, 45-50 metres away , stand in front of it and wave people down warning them .
    if you have numbers one person at either end and one at the scene waiving them past , watching the back of people who are working and co-ordinating either end .

    B. bike recovery , one of the biggest things the victum worries about is there bikes, get there closest mate to start arrangeing bike recovery , trailers etc , because when he is anxious and aggitated and wants to know whats happening , you can say " billy 's arrangeing recovery for you right now " , this will help settle the person.

    C. Helmet labels , Before going openface i allway wore full face helmets with irridium visors and at night especially people cant see in them .
    I had a sticker ( done on a labeller ) 'DO NOT REMOVE IN CASE OF ACCIDENT", this prevented good samaritians removing my helmet if i was unconcious and couldnt speak to let them know.
    If you are concious you can lift the visor so they can see you , but if you arent people tend to try and remove the helmet .

    D. Reverse triage, In remote areas, multiple casualitys and limited resoursces, allways consider reverse triage . I know this sounds creul, but you have limited stores , multiple people and long times toill help arrives then you save as many as you can .
    Starting with those who are going to survive with minimal needs working through to the most serious last .
    Unfortunatley if you use all your stores on one person who may not survive , the 3 or 4 others who start out minor may become serious because you have nothing left to treat with.
    In stead now you have 3 potental deaths instead of one.

    E. first aid kit , get a decent first aid kit , if not for saving someone else but for yourself, make the investment .
    People are happy to blow $500 on bling for the bike , well get down the chemist and blow $100 on bandages , dressings etc etc, it will repay you with your life , a kids school bag ( $5 ) backpack type.
    I dont know how many times i have seen people pull tiny motorcycle kits out at a serious accident ( dont get me wrong its great they carry one ) , but bandaids and 2 bandages and 2 peices of gauze isnt going to help much .
    I have a backpack ( kids school bag ) full, field dressings, collars, bandages, gauze, combines, triangle bandages , torch, pens , textas scissors, knives , paper and heeps of dressings. stethascopes, instruments , you dont need the later (stethascopes, instruments) but have plenty of the rest .
    If you are going to come off a bike or across someone in most cases you will need to have your kit set up for trauma, just having a bigger kits , with more stores etc WILL SAVES LIVES.
    you dont have to were it , strap it too you rack , on the tank or even on a mates rack if you are heading out .

    all the above points are not given as medical advise, but points that may assist and should be considered.

  5. #35
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    All good information here. However, the best thing you can do to help a fellow biker, or anyone unfortunate to have been in an accident is TAKE A COURSE IN FIRST AID!

    Having just finished one in France (apparently the principles are now standardised and international) I always carry a flask of wine and a slice of Brie...

    Seriously, invest some time and a little money, get informed and get some practical experience - a little knowledge can be dangerous.
    Only dead fish go with the flow

  6. #36
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    Good subject , you need to know what to do. About 15-16 years ago , i was on my way to get lunch,came across a accident on a country rd .. there was 2 guys walking round in a complete daze , they had hit the car at an intersection there was a woman absoulutly hysterical she was in the hit car , she was being restrained by another couple ,,,,first on the scene.

    The hit car was on its side , and the petrol line had pinched there was petrol coming out , around the hot exhaust and her son 12-14 was unconsious inside , hence why the woman was hysterical she wanted him out, anyway i jumped on the car leant in throug the drivers window and somehow managed to un buckle him , and pull him out through the window . I dragged / carried him, well away from the car , the ambulance was there a few minuites after, but the boy i thought was dead , his eyes were wide open and seemed life less

    I left it to the ambulance guys ,and left, went home had a hot shower, and changed my clothes that smelled of petrol.

    On my way back to work i stopped, and asked a cop ,who was still there ,cleaning the scene up , how was the lad , the fire brigade was there sorting the car out , and the cop told me he died on the way to hospital .

    To this day i often wonder if i did the right thing ,

    1---- by pulling him out , did i do any damage. Although the cop and the fire men, said i was silly to pull him out, it was a miricle the car had not got up in flames while i was on it , which makes me think, yes i did do the right thing .

    2-- and most importantly , because i thought he was dead , i never gave mouth to mouth, for that couple of minuites while the ambulance got there , , often wonder if i had , would it off saved him , .

    Never actually found out what the boy died off , , when it was on the news , i refused to watch and when the wife started to read it to me in the newspapers , i told her to be quiet i was'nt interested . .

    Its a good subject and one we should all know about. Because i know at that time i did'nt really know what to do .

  7. #37
    Street Cruiser mitchcpc's Avatar
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    Bremerton, Washington
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    Great post..

    Great Post..Thanks..will use it at work for training. I know some folks who could have used this last week, but they did pretty good anyway.

    Thanks again...Always expect the unexpected....
    Mitch

  8. #38
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    I see this to be a really old post but good stuff! Everyone remember though, unless you know a person, take this into consideration as well. There is a ton of bodily fluid type transmitted diseases out there. This is something to be most aware of. Just bailing in can make life difficult for you after the fact should a victim be carrying some type of disease. Be aware of what you are doing, your surroundings, and try to avoid any unecessary contact with "any" bodily fluid should you choose to act.

    I understand this is all about someones life, but you do come first. You don't need to take something home with you to share with the rest of your family. Should you act and come into contact with something, wash as soon as you can! Then I would contact your doctor. He / she can follow up on the victims health and let you know should there be a problem?

    I carry a stat pack in my bike as well with rubber gloves, 1 way valve for respirations, 4 x 4s, cling, sanitizing wipes and hand sanitizer. Just remember to stay out of the bodily fluids if at all possible, they may be evil? We all want to help but please take care of yourself when doing so. Don't comprimise you own health and safety.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsn06 View Post
    Studies by the AHA have also found that most people don't do compressions correctly (incorrect hand placement mostly), including a large portion of health professionals. As far as broken ribs go, better a few broken ribs than dead. "Life over limb" and all.

    Firemedic... yes, the acidosis will kill you, but oxygenation can't be minimized. Both are as equally important in resuscitation as in walking around enjoying life. You can't have one without the other. I've taken care of people who were "successfully" coded with an initial pH in the mid to hi 7.2 range. Yea, they're alive but they're not right in the head and never will be because of an anoxic injury.

    An important point to remember as well in the ABCs is to check for an airway obstruction. Whether you're doing compressions alone or compressions with breaths, no gas will be exchanged if there is something blocking the airway, most commonly the tongue or teeth.
    I go back to the pre-cardio- thump days and before. Since then it seems as though there are changes every time we turn around. Then it was 15 compressions and-2 breaths. 2 fingers up from the diaphram, then between the nipples, and on and on. Now its go like the devil until you get tired and forget about respirations for the most part. Think this will ever get standardized? I carry an important piece of equipment in my response vehicle now, AED. 2 saves in the past 2 months have made me a real believer in this piece of equipment. I'm a fire chief / medic and I think that its important for at least one family member to be trained in standard first aid / CPR.

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